Living with Spinal Cord Injury - Slideshows

View our slideshows and related resources on living with a spinal cord injury.

Bowel Function after Spinal Cord Injury

bowel function

After SCI you may have bowel problems such as moving waste through your colon. Bowel problems can contribute to depression or anxiety. You may feel overly concerned about not being able to control bowel movements in public and not want to do things outside of your home. View the slideshow to learn more about bowel functioning after SCI.

 

Employment after Spinal Cord Injury

man in wheelchair exercising

Most people with SCI want to work yet need support, training and vocational rehabilitation services to help them obtain and keep a job. This support may help to overcome many barriers that are outside the individual’s control, such as financial and health care issues, accessibility, and employer attitudes. View our slideshow to learn more about employment after SCI.

 

Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

Woman pointing to a model human spine

Pain is a serious problem for many people with spinal cord injuries (SCI). Pain after SCI can occur in parts of the body where there is normal sensation (feeling) as well as areas that have little or no feeling. The pain is very real and can have a negative impact on quality of life. View our slideshow to learn more about options for managing pain after SCI.

 

Gait Training after Spinal Cord Injury

man in wheelchair exercising

Gait training is needed because a spinal cord injury damages nerve cells and their connections. This damage can prevent movement signals from the brain to the muscles which typically causes weakness or paralysis in the feet, legs, hips, and trunk, as well as in the hands and arms. View our slideshow to learn more about gait training after SCI.

 

Safe Transfer Technique

man in wheelchair exercising

Transferring in and out of your wheelchair puts higher stress on your arms and shoulders than anything else you do on a regular basis. Learning the correct way to transfer is extremely important in order to keep your arms functioning and pain-free. View our slideshow to learn more about transferring safely in your wheelchair.

 

Related Resources

Factsheets

Woman pointing to a model of a human spine Pain after Spinal Cord Injury
Even though pain after SCI can be complicated and difficult to treat, there are many treatments available that can help. Many people with difficult chronic pain problems after SCI have found relief using techniques described in this factsheet.

 

nurse helping patient with physical therapy Gait Training and Spinal Cord Injury
Gait training is practicing walking with assistive devices, braces and other types of support as needed.

 

Woman in wheelchair waiting for subwayEmployment after Spinal Cord Injury
Most people with spinal cord injuries (SCI) want to work yet need support, training and vocational rehabilitation services to help them obtain and keep a job. View this factsheet for more resources related to employment after a spinal cord injury.