Treatments for chronic pain associated with spinal cord injuries: Many are tried, few are helpful

Short Title:
Treatments for chronic pain associated with spinal cord injuries: Many are tried, few are helpful
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J50729.
Journal:
Clinical Journal of Pain
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2002, vol. 18, issue 3, pp 154-163
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Two groups of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and chronic pain were surveyed regarding the frequency of use of different pain treatments and the perceived helpfulness of these treatments. The most commonly reported treatments were oral medications and physical therapy. Medication types included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and opioids. The treatments rated as most helpful were opioid medications, physical therapy, and diazepam therapy. Those rated as least helpful were spinal cord stimulation, counseling or psychotherapy, administration of acetaminophen, and administration of amitriptyline. Alternative treatments reported as most helpful were massage therapy and use of marijuana. Acupuncture was tried by many but was rated as only moderately helpful. The findings indicate that multiple pain treatments were tried by people with SCI-related pain, but only a few were rated as helpful.
Author(s):
Warms, Catherine A.; Turner, Judith A.; Marshall, Helen M.; Cardenas, Diana D.
Author Address(es):

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