Employment after spinal cord injury: differences related to geographic region, gender, and race

Short Title:
Employment after spinal cord injury: differences related to geographic region, gender, and race
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
1099
Journal:
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
1998, vol. 79, issue 6, pp 615-624
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Article comparing employment outcomes after spinal cord injury (SCI) as a function of several important participant characteristics, including race, sex, age at injury, education, and geographical location (Southeastern US versus Midwestern US). Participants included 1032 individuals with SCI 596 from the Southeast and 435 from the Midwest. It was found that on the average, currently employed participants were Caucasian, were younger when injured, had paraplegia, and had completed more years of education. Geographic differences in employment rates disappeared when controlled for multiple factors, including years of education. However, even after controlling for years of education, Caucasian participants were 2.8 times more likely than minority participants to be working at the time of the study.
Author(s):
Krause, J. S.; Sternberg, M.; Maides, J.; Lottes, S.
Author Address(es):
Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA 30309, USA

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