Gender and minority differences in the pain experience of people with spinal cord injury

Short Title:
Gender and minority differences in the pain experience of people with spinal cord injury
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J46769.
Journal:
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2004, vol. 85, issue 11, pp 1774-1781
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Study examined gender and minority differences in the prevalence and severity of pain in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) as reported in follow-up surveys. Pain prevalence ranged from 81 percent at 1 year post injury to 82.7 percent at 25 years. Pain prevalence was significantly lower among non-whites, although they tended to report a higher average pain severity score when pain was present. People with SCI who were employed at the time of injury, who had more than a high school education, and who were not tetraplegic reported a higher prevalence of pain. Overall, women with SCI were no more likely to report pain or more severe pain than men.
Author(s):
Cardenas, Diana D.; Bryce, Thomas N.; Shem, Kazuko; Richards, J. Scott; Elhefni, Hanaa
Author Address(es):

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