Prognostic importance of self-reported traits/problems/strengths & environmental barriers/facilitators for predicting participation outcomes in persons with traumatic brain injury: A systematic review

Short Title:
Prognostic importance of self-reported traits/problems/strengths & environmental barriers/facilitators for predicting participation outcomes in persons with traumatic brain injury: A systematic review
Model System:
TBI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J69094
Journal:
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2014, vol. 1, issue 95, pp 1162-1173
Publication Website:
Abstract:
This systematic review examined evidence for the prognostic value of self-reported traits/problems/strengths and environmental barriers/facilitators of participation outcomes in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). PubMed, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases were searched for articles published through August 15, 2013. Each of the 996 abstracts identified by the search and those failing to meet all inclusion criteria were excluded. Data were extracted from the 63 retained articles by 2 independent reviewers and study quality was determined using American Academy of Neurology (AAN) criteria. Conclusions regarding prognostic importance of self-report and environmental barrier/facilitator variables were made using AAN criteria. The highest level of available evidence regarding barrier/facilitator variables indicated that access to transportation, access to services, and participation in social interaction were possibly predictive of employment outcome. In contrast, living arrangements and social support were possibly not predictive of employment outcome. The evidence regarding self-report variables indicated that the number of postconcussive symptoms, fatigue, and physical competence were probably predictive of employment and need for supervision, whereas self-efficacy was probably not predictive of employment. Subjective well-being, pain, and social interaction were possibly predictive of employment, whereas coping style was possibly not predictive. Although additional investigation is needed, the findings suggest that self-report variables are likely to make important contributions to predicting participation outcomes. Future research should be guided by coherent conceptual models and use a consistent set of assessment instruments to facilitate comparisons between studies
Author(s):
Sherer, M, Davis, LC, Sander, AM, Caroselli, JS, Clark, AN, Pastorek, NJ
Author Address(es):

Some items may be available for document delivery from the National Rehabilitation Information Center. Make a note of the title and any accession number and contact NARIC at 800-346-2742 to request a copy. There is a charge for document delivery from the NARIC collection.