Association of internet use and depression among the spinal cord injury population

Short Title:
Association of internet use and depression among the spinal cord injury population
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J68258
Journal:
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2014, vol. 1, issue 95, pp 236-243
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Study examined the relationship between the frequency of Internet use and depression among people with spinal cord injury (SCI). A total of 4,618 people with SCI who had been admitted to one of the regional centers in the SCI Model Systems were interviewed. The frequency of Internet use and the severity of depressive symptoms were measured simultaneously by the interview. Internet use was reported as daily, weekly, monthly, or none. The depressive symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), with 2 published criteria being used to screen for depressive disorder. The diagnostic method places more weight on nonsomatic items, and the cut-off method that determines depression by a (PHQ-9) score =10 places more weight on somatic factors. The average scores of somatic and nonsomatic items represented the severity of somatic and nonsomatic symptoms, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression model indicated that daily Internet users were less likely to have depressive symptoms if the diagnostic method was used. The linear multivariate regression analysis indicated that daily and weekly Internet usage were associated with fewer nonsomatic symptoms; no significant association was observed between daily or weekly Internet usage and somatic symptoms. Overall, results suggest that people with SCI who used the Internet daily were less likely to have depressive symptoms.
Author(s):
Tsai I, Graves D, Lai CH, Hwang L, Pompeii L
Author Address(es):
Participating Centers:

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