Improvements in long-term survival after spinal cord injury?

Short Title:
Improvements in long-term survival after spinal cord injury?
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J71250
Journal:
ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2014, vol. 1, issue 96, pp 645
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Study investigated whether there have been improvements in long-term survival after spinal cord injury (SCI) in recent decades. Specifically, this study examined mortality in people with SCI since 1973, focusing on the most recent period 2005 to 2012, to determine whether long-term survival, survival relative to the general population, and life expectancy .has changed. Participants were 31,531 patients treated at National SCI Model Systems facilities who survived 2 years after injury, were older than 10 years, and who did not require ventilator support. These subjects contributed 484,979 person-years of data, with 8,536 deaths over the 39-year (1973 to 2012) study period. The data were analyzed using the logistic regression model, Poisson regression model with comparison to the general population, and the computation of standardized mortality ratios for various groups. The outcome variable was survival or mortality, and the explanatory variables were age, sex, level and grade of injury, and calendar year. After adjustment for age, sex, race, etiology of injury, time since injury, and level and grade of injury, mortality in persons with SCI was higher in the 2005 to 2012 period than in 1990 to 2004 or 1980 to 1989, the odds ratios for these 3 periods were .857, .826, and .802, respectively, as compared with the 1970 to 1979 reference period. There was no evidence of improvement. The authors conclude that long-term survival after SCI has not changed over the past 30 years.
Author(s):
Tate DG, Forchheimer M, Tulsky D, Kisala PA, Rodriguez G, Cameron A, Chiodo A.
Author Address(es):

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