Epidemiology of adults receiving acute inpatient rehabilitation for a primary diagnosis of traumatic brain injury in the United States

Short Title:
Epidemiology of adults receiving acute inpatient rehabilitation for a primary diagnosis of traumatic brain injury in the United States
Model System:
TBI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J71202
Journal:
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2014, vol. 1, issue 97, pp 1950-1958
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Study examined the overall and by-age characteristics of patients aged 16 years and older undergoing acute inpatient rehabilitation for a primary diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States between 2001 and 2010. Data were obtained from the TBI Model Systems National Database. The incidence of TBI by age group found the largest proportion of cases to be aged 80 years and older. Injuries resulted predominantly from falls and motor vehicle crashes; however, injuries to the youngest individuals were largely from motor vehicle crashes with decreasing rates as age increased, while injuries due to falls rose as age increased, with the oldest age groups most likely to incur a TBI. Age distributions demonstrated high pre-injury alcohol and substance misuse among individuals younger than 50 years with decreasing misuse as age increased. Of the total population, 49.2 percent were retired, 31.1 percent employed, 14.1 percent not working, and 5.6 percent students. Trends by age showed that younger individuals were more likely to be students or employed, with employment status peaking for those aged 30 to 39 years, and declining to 3.2 percent for those aged 80 years and older. The trend of living alone between pre- and post-rehabilitation showed the least amount of change for those aged 16 to 19 years, with steadily increasing changes as age increased. Similar trends were seen for residence changes pre- and post-rehabilitation, with the youngest most likely to return to living at a private residence, and a gradual decrease in return to living at a private residence as age increased. Functional Independence Measure scores demonstrated that younger individuals had lower scores at admission and higher scores at rehabilitation discharge.
Author(s):
Cuthbert, J.P., Harrison-Felix, C., Corrigan, J.D., Kreider, S., Bell, J.M., Coronado, V.G., Whiteneck, G.G.
Author Address(es):
Participating Centers:

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