Does pain interference mediate the relationship of independence in ambulation with depressive symptoms after spinal cord injury?

Short Title:
Does pain interference mediate the relationship of independence in ambulation with depressive symptoms after spinal cord injury?
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
Journal:
Rehabilitation Psychology Psychology
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2007, vol. 52, issue 2, pp 162-169
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Purpose/Objective: To test a mediational model that hypothesizes pain interference mediates the relationship between ambulatory status and depressive symptoms among participants with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Research Method/Design: Responses to the Brief Pain Index (pain interference) and the Older Adult Health and Mood Questionnaire (depressive symptoms) were obtained from 1,545 adults with SCI. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of clinically significant symptomatology and probable major depression as a function of independence in ambulation and to evaluate the extent to which pain interference mediated the relationship between ambulation and a depressive diagnosis. Results: Partially dependent ambulators reported significantly greater odds of clinically significant symptomatology (2.30) and probable major depression (2.00) compared with independent ambulators prior to evaluation of pain interference (comparisons of wheelchair users with independent ambulators were not significant). However, these relationships were no longer significant after controlling for pain interference. Conclusions/Implications: Pain interference appears to mediate the relationship between ambulatory status and depressive symptoms after SCI.
Author(s):
Krause, J. S.; Brotherton, S.; Morrisette, D.; Newman, S.; Karakostas, T.
Author Address(es):
Sandra S. Brotherton, PT, PhD, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425. E-mail: brothers@musc.edu

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