Further similarities between cutaneous scarring in the female, red Duroc pig and human hypertrophic scarring

Short Title:
Further similarities between cutaneous scarring in the female, red Duroc pig and human hypertrophic scarring
Model System:
Burn
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
Journal:
Burns
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2004, vol. 30, issue 6, pp 518-30
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertrophic scarring following deep dermal injuries is minimal due to the lack of an animal model. We previously confirmed that thick scars in female, red Duroc pigs (FRDP) are similar to human hypertrophic scar. The purpose of this study was to evaluate TGFbeta1, IGF-1, decorin, and versican expression in FRDP wounds. Deep and shallow wounds on the backs of two FRDPs were studied over 5 months. Immunohistochemistry was performed for TGFbeta1, IGF-1, decorin, and versican. TGFbeta1 and IGF-1 mRNA were evaluated by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR. In shallow wounds (1) TGFbeta1 protein was not detectable and IGF-1 protein was seen at 10 days post-wounding. TGFbeta1 and IGF-1 mRNA were elevated for 30 days. (2) Decorin protein was not detected at 10th day, but returned to levels of uninjured skin. (3) Versican protein was not detectable at any time. In deep wounds, (1) TGFbeta1 and IGF-1 protein and mRNA were elevated early, (2) decorin protein was greatly reduced for the first 90 days, and (3) versican protein was present from 30 to 150 days. These findings correlate with findings reported in the literature for human hypertrophic scar and further validate the FRDP model of hypertrophic scarring.
Author(s):
Zhu, K.Q.; Engrav, L.H.; Tamura, R.N.; Cole, J.A.; Muangman, P.; Carrougher, G.J.; Gibran, N.S.
Author Address(es):
Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington, Mailstop 359796, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, USA
Participating Centers:

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