Subjective well-being among African Americans with spinal cord injury: An exploratory study between men and women

Short Title:
Subjective well-being among African Americans with spinal cord injury: An exploratory study between men and women
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J50331.
Journal:
NeuroRehabilitation
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2004, vol. 19, issue 2, pp 81-89
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Study identified gender differences in subjective well-being among African Americans with spinal cord injury (SCI). Measures of subjective well-being included the Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised, the Purpose in Life Scale, and the Older Adult Health and Mood Questionnaire. Results showed that women reported higher scores on depressive symptoms and negative affect, but lower scores on purpose in life. Women reported having significantly more problems than men with pain, depression, family, sadness, stress, and worries. Men reported greater problems with pressure ulcers and sexual issues.
Author(s):
Krause, James S.; Broderick, Lynne E.; Broyles, Joy
Author Address(es):

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