Demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with disparity in wheelchair customizability among people with traumatic spinal cord injury

Short Title:
Demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with disparity in wheelchair customizability among people with traumatic spinal cord injury
Model System:
SCI
Reference Type:
Journal Article
Accession No.:
J46783.
Journal:
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Year, Volume, Issue, Page(s):
2004, vol. 85, issue 11, pp 1859-1864
Publication Website:
Abstract:
Study investigated whether a standard of care for wheelchair provision existed within Model Spinal Cord Injury Systems and if there was disparity in wheelchair customizability among participants with spinal cord injury (SCI). Data obtained from interviews with 412 subjects with SCI who use wheelchairs and from the national database included age, race, education, level of injury, wheelchair funding source, and number of wheelchairs owned. Wheelchair manufacturer and model were reviewed and chairs were classified by type (power or manual) and design features (standard or customizable). Analysis revealed that 97 percent of manual wheelchair users and 54 percent of power wheelchair users had customizable wheelchairs. The standard of care for manual wheelchair users is a lightweight and customizable wheelchair and the standard of care for power wheelchair users is one with programmable controls. Minorities with low income, who were Medicaid/Medicare recipients, and who were less educated were more likely to have standard manual and standard programmable power wheelchairs. Low socioeconomic status was associated with having a standard wheelchair and not having an additional wheelchair.
Author(s):
Hunt, Peter C.; Boninger, Michael L.; Cooper, Rory A.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Fitzgerald, Shirley G.; Schmeler, Mark R.
Author Address(es):

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